From A Girl’s Eye View – Guest Perspective

“If you have to demand something from someone, you are confessing they have it.” Wow! That’s pretty profound isn’t it?—Especially in relations to women’s rights. I love books. So one of my friends let me borrow a book that she thought I would thoroughly enjoy called “Understanding The Power and Purpose Of Woman”, by Dr. Myles Munroe. I have to admit after only reading half of the first chapter that it already had my mind turning, and me jumping on my laptop to share my thoughts. So far, Dr. Munroe speaks about how the perception of women in the past still persists in today’s society. To share some of his points, women are: inferior to men, lacking in intelligence and therefore having nothing to contribute to society, weak; incapable of real strength and domestic slaves to be used as desired.Read More »

Selma – 50 Years Later

Disappointed that plans to be in Selma, Alabama this morning fell through, I sit and watch the program on CNN. This may be a once in a lifetime occurrence to be in a reunion of the Civil Rights Movement that changed the face of this nation hosted by an African-American president. Usually I refer to our people as Black American as we all identify differently. In this case, however, our president is in fact half Kenyan! He is African American.

I am in part, surprised and relieved of his blatant admittance of the existence of America’s lingering racial issues. It is not a dead horse that we continue to beat. I am no criminal and never have been, but I feel as though I have experienced enough discrimination to know personally, that skin color is enough to get you in trouble. Over the last few years, with the publicized deaths of a few innocent blacks, I believe that the nation is becoming more aware as well.

I am glad too that he is discussing the personal responsibility of Black Americans to vote and make sure that our call for equal rights are met. As we grow more and more complacent with the  illusion of equality, actual equality start to slip back into nonexistence.

I have just as much patriotism as the next man, but it comes in a different form as I come from a different branch in our nation’s history.

DuBois vs. Washington: Common Ground Wins the Vote

There are so many prerequisites of actual experience needed to understand the identity crises that Black American men (specifically men) go through while growing into adulthood. With this in mind, I always try to give background on whatever position I may take on an issue. In this particular instance, it was a little more age, a little more understanding and a just few experiences that changed how I feel about the positions of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois.

From the ages of 15 and about 22 years old, I ignorantly and openly made it clear that I disagreed with the methods that Washington thought Black Americans should have taken to educate and grow as a people. Washington felt as though Blacks should continue their menial jobs while quietly getting their educations to avoid hinderances from whites. I hated the idea of that; I felt as though it was cowering.Read More »